Resources: Academic Library Job Interviews & Salary Negotiation

Hi, everyone–

As promised, I’m following up on the “Making Yourself Marketable for Academic Librarian Positions” webcast with some resources. Here are some recent favorites on (a)* interviewing for academic librarian positions and (b) salary negotiation in academic libraries.

Resources on Interviewing

  • Academic LIS Job Seeking — extensive notes from a presentation that Bronwen K. Maxson gave at the Pratt Institute last month. (Check out the list of additional resources at the end, too.) She notes that much of her advice is adapted from Teresa Y. Neely’s How to Stay Afloat in the Academic Job Market.
  • Library and Technology Jobs: Library Interview Questions — by Leila Gibradze of Florida State University. This guide hits all of the standard questions. It also links to additional resources on the academic library job search process.

  • The Academic Interview Process — by Nanako Kodaira for the ALA New Members’ Round Table. An overview of everything that happens at a standard academic librarian job interview. Includes sample interview questions.
  • Library Interview Questions — Mr. Library Dude, who has one of the best pen names in the business, links to numerous pages with a range of interview questions. Includes the standards as well as special topics and concerns.

Resources on Salary Negotiation

Please share additional resources by adding a comment or contacting me.

*Just how long will it take me to stop adding APA-formatted lists to everything I write without even thinking about it? Silly dissertation. 🙂

Fresh Career Advice: The Future Academic Librarian’s Toolkit

futureaclibtoolkit

A few years ago, librarian Megan Hodge (Virginia Commonwealth University) announced a project that I truly believe in. Her project has now come to fruition: The Future Academic Librarian’s Toolkit was published by the American Library Association earlier this month. I’m honored to have written a chapter titled “Making Yourself Marketable for Academic Librarian Positions,” which you can read via my institution’s repository (thanks, ALA, for making the book Creative Commons-friendly).

I love the depth and honesty of the discussion. How do I plan my search? What do I do if it isn’t going well? Are there interesting career paths that I may not have heard about? (The answer is “yes.”) Highly recommended for institutions and libraries that teach and employ LIS students.